Author: srikanth

The Academic Workshop Organiser’s Checklist

#PhoMedDia2018 A bit late than never! Finally found time to upload some pics taken at the #GCRF @AIPTMultiply Photonics for Medical Diagnostics Workshop at Aston University this September. It was a great learning experience, met some lovely people, and in all had fun! Till soon! pic.twitter.com/zqIgxcNxOQ — Srikanth Sugavanam (@Srikanthislive) 6 October 2018 It’s been…
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Rediscovering Chopin

Chopin Monument in Warsaw with the permission of the authors Marek and Ewa Wojciechowscy (from Wikipedia).   Literally a stone’s throw away from Aston University, the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire makes for a much needed pit stop from my weekly grind. It is a reassuring sight to see scores of eager young individuals immersing themselves in music and honing…
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Confirmation bias in the sciences – a double edged sword?

Baijayanta Roy   Confirmation bias is a tricky thing to write about. One only needs to put her guard down for a while and the biases about confirmation bias creeps in. Confirmation bias is the psychological tendency of a person to seek or interpret evidence in ways those are partial or biased to existing beliefs,…
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A proposition for incentivizing peer-review

 Srikanth Sugavanam, Baijayanta Roy How do we motivate reviewers to be more actively involved in the peer review process, and also enhance the quality of the peer review they provide? Critical, unbiased peer review is vital for scientific progress. It helps validate one’s ideas, derive constructive criticism, initiate dialogue, uncover hidden biases in one’s thinking,…
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Never eat your lunch alone

Research can be taxing, particularly when you are starting out your PhD. Given the pressure of deadlines set by grants, crunch periods take a whole new meaning. It feels like a crime to catch a breathe even for a few seconds, leading to long working hours, working lunches, diminishing social life… You can see where…
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9 ways to give a bad presentation

  Presentations are a great way to disseminate science. It’s your chance to tag your face with the science you did. However, given it’s your baby, it is highly likely you would want to delve into every little idiosyncracy of the subject matter. TMI often rings the death knell of what potentially could have been a…
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